Major mods and rock guards

What is it about camper mods? Why can't we just leave well enough alone? Why do we need to take something that's perfectly fine the way it is - or at the very least perfectly useable - and adjust it, tweak it, add to it, take from it, replace it, strengthen it, loosen it ...

You get the idea.

But, most of the time we modify our RVs out of necessity.

Like last spring, when my buddy and I installed a stainless steel rock guard on the front of my 2000 Trail-Lite B22 Bantam hybrid. I had no intention of installing a rock guard, but then the glue started failing along the bottom seam that attached the front panel to the floor, so something had to be done.

Sure, I could have simply bought more glue and applied it to the seam. Then, a year or two from now, I would have needed to do it again.

No, something more substantial was needed. So I got a piece of stainless steel, about 8 feet by 4 feet - wide enough to cover from side-to-side and long enough to start just under the bed end, follow the front curve down to the seam, then wrap under the camper another foot or so.

A machine shop applied the curve to the metal and the fold to fit along the bottom seam. Elbow grease drilled holes along the top and bottom, ran stainless steel carriage bolts from the outside in, and lock nuts kept them in place. A healthy dose of silicone made it watertight and acted as a bonding agent. As soon as weather permits, I'll get some photos posted.

All in all, it took one afternoon, a case of beer and the help of a good friend.
And, we all agreed, the new rock guard will live longer than the camper.

Actually, it's no so much a rock guard as it is a permanent fix to a failing seam. But rock guard rolls off the tongue much easier when campground neighbors are asking about any mods I might have done to the RV.

Now, what else can I do ...