Ohio DNR: Portage Lake State Park's dam project won't lower lake level

Portage Lakes Dam Improvement Project will proceed without lowering lake water level to normal fall drawdown

COLUMBUS, OH – Work on rehabilitating the Portage Lakes State Park’s West Reservoir will not require the lake level to be lowered, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

The use of a hydraulic pile driver, a relatively new technology, will allow construction to proceed without lowering the lake level ahead of the previously scheduled draw down. Initially it was thought the lake level would have to be dropped by three feet for the project a month ahead of time.

“Our priority throughout this project was to make sure it was being conducted in the safest manner possible and to protect the lives of people and property around the lake,” said David Payne, chief of Ohio State Parks. “The use of this new technology will allow us to proceed in a safe manner without inconveniencing the many boaters who enjoy the use of the lake.”

Construction on the project is anticipated to begin in August. The dam, built in the 1840s, will be reinforced with a sturdy concrete shell that will be covered with soil and replanted with grass to maintain its historic appearance. The existing spillway will also be replaced with a new concrete spillway and the pedestrian bridge on the crest of the dam will be demolished and replaced with a new bridge. The project is expected to be completed in August 2012.

This year’s normal fall drawdown will occur in mid-October through mid-November. After this year, the traditional fall drawdown will occur every other year.

The West Reservoir Dam project is part of an ongoing capital construction improvement program for the Portage Lakes to ensure that the dams and associated structures are safe. Area residents may notice increased truck traffic along with some noise and dust while construction is underway. Residents are urged to keep children a safe distance from the construction site and the equipment.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

Michigan DNR to host 3 Emerald Ash Borer workshops

DNR to host Ash Management workshops to address Emerald Ash Borer damage in the Northern Lower Peninsula

The Department of Natural Resources will host three emerald ash borer (EAB) forest management workshops in May for private forest landowners in the northern Lower Peninsula. These workshops are being offered through a forest health grant offered through the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service.

The workshops are designed for landowners who are interested in learning how to best manage upland hardwood stands containing ash to remedy impacts from EAB infestation. EAB is an invasive species that has caused significant damage to ash trees across Michigan. Proper ash management directly after EAB invasion can help landowners recoup some of their timber investment, while also slowing the spread of the invasive borers across the landscape.

Foresters and forest health specialists will give workshop participants information on ash management; timber sale setup and implementation; EAB biology; current outbreak locations; and a general update on forest health issues. Presenters will also share information on federal and state programs that address EAB problems.

Workshops will be held at the following times and locations:
  • Monday, May 9, Northwest Michigan MSU Horticultural Research Center, 6686 South Center Hwy., Traverse City, 6:30 to 9 p.m. 
  • Tuesday, May 10, Bear Creek Township Hall, 373 North Division Rd., Petoskey, 6:30 to 9 p.m.
  • Thursday, May 12, Alpena Community College, Besser Technical Center, Room 122, 665 Johnson St., Alpena, 6:30 to 9 p.m.

For more information about the EAB workshops, contact DNR Forester Michael Hanley at 517-241-1608 or Georgia Peterson at 517-335-7383. To learn more about EAB in Michigan, go online to www.michigan.gov/foresthealth or www.emeraldashborer.info.

Bald Mountain Recreation Area Holding Rustic Cabin Open House and Cookout May 7

Campers longing for the rustic feel of the outdoors with some comforts of home can choose to vacation in one of Michigan state park or recreation area’s rustic cabins. To preview the rustic cabin experience, visit Bald Mountain Recreation Area during its Rustic Cabin Cookout and Open House from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7.

Park personnel will be cooking hot dogs, serving chili and roasting marshmallows while offering tours of the parks’ two rustic cabins, the trails and grounds around them. The tour will showcase the cabins’ recent updates, including new log cabin furniture, mattresses, screens and fresh paint.

“With the cabins open and hot food cooking over the campfire, visitors will be able to visualize what their own camping experience would be like,” said Department of Natural Resources Unit Supervisor Tom Bissett.

Each cabin rents for $80 per night and sleeps up to 20 people. The cabins do not provide electricity or water; however, a wood stove provides heat for each cabin.

If a rustic cabin stay already sounds like a plan, cabin reservations can be made on-line at www.midnrreservations.com, or by calling the central reservation system at 800-447-2757.

Bald Mountain Recreation Area in Oakland County is located at 1330 E. Greenshield Rd. in Lake Orion, one and one-half miles east of M-24. Entrance to the cabins is off Harmon Road, north of Stony Creek Road.

For more information about this event, the park, accessibility, or persons needing accommodations to attend this event, contact the park supervisor at 248-693-6767 (TTY/TDD711 Michigan Relay Center for the hearing impaired), or visit www.michigan.gov/baldmountain.

Lottery deadline to tour Ohio's Cranberry Bog State Nature Preserve is May 31

Lottery to be held for those wishing to attend annual tour of Cranberry Bog State Nature Preserve Tour is scheduled for Saturday, June 18, at Buckeye Lake's north shore

COLUMBUS, OH – Nature enthusiasts throughout Ohio are encouraged to enter a lottery to tour Ohio's only floating island – Cranberry Bog State Nature Preserve in Buckeye Lake – during the bog's annual open house from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 18.

Attendance at this popular open house is limited, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Natural Areas and Preserves.

Anyone interested in touring the bog on June 18 should send a postcard to the ODNR Division of Natural Areas & Preserves, 2045 Morse Road, Building C-3, Columbus, Ohio 43229. Postcards must be postmarked by May 31 and contain the following information: contact name, address with zip code, daytime phone number and total number of people in the party (not to exceed four). Only one postcard will be accepted per family.

The lottery drawing will be held in early June, and winners will be notified by mail. Walk-in visitors are welcome to attend, however, they will not be guaranteed a time slot. Boat transportation to and from the island will be provided by the Greater Buckeye Lake Historical Society for a donation of $5 per person.

Cranberry Bog is one of Ohio's most unique natural areas. The 11-acre island, located approximately 100 yards off the north shoreof Buckeye Lake in Fairfield County, was registered as a National Natural Landmark in 1968. Its unique composition gives the island a spongy surface, therefore visitors are required to remain on the boardwalk.

The island dates from 1830 when Buckeye Lake was created as a feeder reservoir for the Ohio & Erie Canal. A 50-acre portion of the lake’s bed, once a thriving sphagnum bog, rose with the waters. Cranberry Bog is what remains of that portion after nearly two centuries.

Aside from the annual open house, visitation to Cranberry Bog State Nature Preserve is by written permit only.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

Gas-Saving Free Camper Storage Program Continues at Michigan State Parks

The Michigan Department of Natural Resource announced today that the gas-saving, camper storage program at select Michigan state parks and recreation areas will continue this camping season to help families offset the cost of rising gas prices and enjoy their summer vacation plans.

In 2008, the DNR announced a new gas-saving, camper storage pilot program that offered campers the opportunity to save fuel by temporarily storing their camping trailer or recreational vehicle at participating state parks or recreation areas. The pilot program was scheduled to expire in September of 2008, but with the gas prices continuing to increase each year, the program will continue into its fourth season.

“This pilot program was a huge success,” said Ron Olson, chief of the DNR Parks and Recreation Division. “Due to its overwhelming success, and numerous requests from campers and park staff to continue the program, we decided to continue to extend this program to encourage families to continue their summer vacation plans and help offset the cost of rising gas prices.”

Storage of the camping units will remain free and limited to 15 days. Storage will only be available at participating state parks or recreation areas, and only until the park or recreation area closes for the season.

Campers wishing to take advantage of this program will need to show proof of a recent or future (within one week) camping stay at a Michigan state park or recreation area campground.

Intermittent Camping Storage, companion to the Gas Saving Storage Pilot Program, allows on-site storage of camping units in participating state parks or recreation area campgrounds. This program has also been a success at select locations for many years.

The storage fee of $4 per night during unoccupied periods has been eliminated and the program is managed using the following criteria:

Free nights will only be available Sunday thru Thursday nights.
The full camping rate will be charged during the weekends (Friday and Saturday nights).
Camping units must be unplugged and unoccupied to qualify for the free nights.
This only applies to specific state parks and recreation areas participating in Intermittent Camping Storage.

For more information about these programs, the parks participating in these programs, and the continued opportunity to save on fuel costs, contact the DNR Parks and Recreation Division office at 517-373-9900, or visit the DNR website at www.michigan.gov/camperstorge. To find out if a participating park or recreation area has space available, or to find out when they plan to close for the 2011 camping season, contact the park or recreation area.

“The Recreation Passport also makes it affordable for Michigan residents and families to continue to enjoy their summer vacation plans,” said Olson. “At only $10 for resident motor vehicles, and $5 for resident motorcycles, Michigan residents can enjoy the outdoors at any state park or recreation area, as well as access over 1,100 boating access sites. With a state park or recreation area within one hour of any place in Michigan, I encourage Michigan residents and visitors to GO-Get Outdoors this summer.”

Camping reservations can be made on-line at www.midnrreservations.com, or by calling the central reservation system at 1-800-447-2757. For a list of events taking place at your state parks and recreation areas, visit the Get Outdoors Calendar at www.michigan.gov/gogetoutdoors.

The Recreation Passport has replaced motor vehicle permits for entry into Michigan state parks, recreation areas and state-administered boating access fee sites. This new way to fund Michigan's outdoor recreation opportunities also helps to preserve state forest campgrounds, trails, and historic and cultural sites in state parks, and provides park development grants to local communities.

Michigan residents can purchase the Recreation Passport ($10 for motor vehicles; $5 for motorcycles) by checking "Yes" on their license plate renewal forms, or at any state park or recreation area. To learn more about the Recreation Passport, visit www.michigan.gov/recreationpassport or call 517-241-7275.

Non-resident motor vehicles must still display a valid Non-Resident Recreation Passport ($29 annual; $8 daily) to enter a Michigan state park, recreation area or state-administered boating access fee site, which can be purchased at any state park or recreation area, or through the Michigan e-Store at www.michigan.gov/estore.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

Put outdoor expertise to work with Michigan DNR’s new Recreation 101 program

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is seeking experienced volunteer program guides from across the state to lead hands-on clinics for its Recreation 101 program, to be offered at Michigan state parks, recreation areas and boating facilities throughout the state.

Recreation 101, sponsored by Merrell, a Michigan-based outdoor shoes and clothing company, will offer free introductory lessons that acquaint novice outdoor enthusiasts with the skills and knowledge to get them started in a new activity or sport. Introductory courses will range from hiking, biking, hunting, fishing, paddling and horseback riding, to geo-caching, birding and trail running.

Enabling Michigan residents to get outdoors and get active is one of DNR and Merrell’s top priorities. The Recreation Passport, which replaced motor vehicle permits for entry into all of Michigan’s state parks and boating access sites, provides visitors with close, affordable access to all the recreational opportunities available in Michigan state parks, recreation areas and boating facilities.

“Our focus is making the Michigan state park system a workable, enjoyable resource for Michigan residents and all state park visitors,” said Ron Olson, chief of the DNR Parks and Recreation Division. “We want to provide them with the tools necessary to learn any new skill, and allow them to experience all their parks have to offer.”

Often it takes just simple one-on-one instruction for a person to build the confidence to start a new sport they have always wanted to try or inspire their interest in a new activity.

“It is our hope that programs like Recreation 101 will inspire more people to get outside and have fun,” said Amy Roder, marketing specialist at Merrell. “The more tools we can provide to make the outdoors an accessible place to play, the more we know people will make a connection with their natural surroundings and actively participate in the outdoors, making it a central part of their lives.”

Volunteer guides should have a passion for the outdoors and a desire to share their recreational knowledge and skills. Along with individuals who are proficient in their particular field, ideal guides would be outfitters, retailers or brand representatives who can provide hands-on sample gear for students to try. Only the range of expertise of interested volunteers limits offerings.

For more information about volunteering for the Recreation 101 program, contact Maia Stephens, DNR Parks and Recreation recreation programmer, at 989-225-8573 or stephensm3@michigan.gov. To learn more about Merrell and its products, visit www.merrell.com.

Michigan DNR seeking volunteers in May to remove non-native plants

Volunteers to Help Remove Non-Native Plants, Replace with Native Plantings
 
The Department of Natural Resources is seeking volunteers for stewardship workdays at southeast Michigan state parks and recreation areas in May. Volunteers will help remove garlic mustard, a non-native invasive plant, from natural areas while other volunteers will help with native plantings at Algonac and Sterling state parks.

This activity will help protect and restore unique natural areas in these southern Michigan state parks and recreation areas, especially woodlands. Volunteering for these workdays is a great way to get outdoors, enjoy spring, and promote a healthy lifestyle with light exercise, all while helping to preserve our natural resources.

Dates, times and locations of the workdays are as follows:
  • Sunday, May 1, Highland Recreation Area (Oakland County), 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Saturday, May 7, Island Lake Recreation Area (Livingston County), 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Saturday, May 14, Bald Mountain Recreation Area (Oakland County), 9 a.m. to noon
  • Saturday, May 14, Saugatuck Dunes State Park (Allegan County), 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Saturday, May 14, Waterloo Recreation Area (Washtenaw County), 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Sunday, May 15, Highland Recreation Area (Oakland County), 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Sunday, May 15, Algonac State Park (St. Clair County), 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Saturday, May 21, Bald Mountain Recreation Area (Oakland County), 9 a.m. to noon
  • Sunday, May 22, Pinckney Recreation Area (Washtenaw County), 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, May 22, Sterling State Park (Monroe County), 1 to 4 p.m.

Volunteers should bring appropriate clothing and be prepared for outdoor work, including long pants, boots, gloves, sunscreen and drinking water.

These efforts are part of the Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) initiative to control invading species and help protect the natural heritage of Michigan state parks in the process. For more information about getting involved in the EDRR initiative, visit the DNR website at www.michigan.gov/dnr-parkstewardship.

For more information about the specific tasks at each location and to obtain directions, visit the www.michigan.gov/dnrvolunteers and link to the “Calendar of Volunteer Stewardship Workdays.” All volunteers are asked to register using the form available on the web site. Any questions should be directed to Laurel Malvitz-Draper at malvitzl@michigan.gov or call 248-359-9067.

Michigan's trout season opens April 30 with tournament

Tournament kicks off Michigan's trout season at Proud Lake State Recreation Area April 30

The Department of Natural Resources and the Friends of Proud Lake will celebrate the opening weekend of trout season at Proud Lake Recreation Area. The Proud Lake Trout Festival is being held on Saturday, April 30, from 6 to 10 a.m.

The event includes a catch-and-keep fishing tournament and a pancake breakfast. An award will be presented for the biggest fish. A valid 2011 Michigan fishing license is required. The event is free, but donations are accepted to help benefit the friends group’s planned activities.

Proud Lake Recreation Area is located at 3500 Wixom Rd., seven miles north of I-96, off Exit 159, in Commerce Township. The park is located on the scenic Huron River, and offers more than 4,700 acres of diverse and plentiful recreational opportunities, with more than 20 miles of trails and an abundance of wildflowers blooming in the spring.

For more information about this event, the park, accessibility, or persons needing accommodations to participate in this event, contact the park at 248-685-2433 (TTY/TDD711 Michigan Relay Center for the hearing impaired), or visit www.michigan.gov/proudlake.

The park also offers modern camping, camper cabins and the unique River Hawk Lodge. Camping reservations can be made online at www.midnrreservations.com, or by calling the central reservation system at 800-447-2757.

Camping season starts May 20 at Oakland County (Mich.) Parks

Addison Oaks and Groveland Oaks campgrounds will open on Friday, May 20.
Both parks offer four to six-person cabins for those who want to “sleep in style.” All cabins include a refrigerator, electricity, table and chairs, outdoor fire pit and cooking grill. Campsites include a nearby modern restroom and shower building.

Trails, fishing, swimming, boating, baseball and volleyball fields, row and pedal boat rentals, bike rentals and a children’s playground are available at both parks.

Addison Oaks features a 24-hole disc golf course, 7.5 miles of trails and a 3.6-mile equestrian trail. Groveland Oaks features a spiraling waterslide, an 18-hole mini golf course, a skate park area and one-mile paved Thread Creek Trail.

Advance reservations are available for cabins, group sites and pavilions, as well as 48 select individual campsites at each park. Campsite maps are available online.

Phone reservations will be taken Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Addison Oaks and 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Groveland Oaks until the campgrounds open. After May 20, reservations can be made for both campgrounds Monday through Sunday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Reservations for cabins, pavilions and group areas for Groveland Oaks can only be made Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Full payment plus $8 reservation fee must be made at the time of reservation. Call 248-858-1400 to reserve a campsite.
  • Addison Oaks County Park, 1480 West Romeo Road in Leonard 
  • Groveland Oaks County Park, 14555 Dixie Highway in Holly.
For more information about Oakland County Parks and Recreation, visit DestinationOakland.com or find us on Facebook.

DNR Reminds public to leave wildlife in the wild

As spring brings the season for wildlife to give birth, the Department of Natural Resources reminds Michigan residents to resist the instinct to try to help seemingly abandoned fawns or other baby animals.

“The truth is, the animal doesn’t need help – even if a fawn appears to be abandoned, its mother is almost always nearby,” said DNR wildlife biologist Sherry MacKinnon. “We appreciate the good intentions of those who want to help, but the animals are better off left alone than removed from the wild.”

MacKinnon said it’s not uncommon for does to leave their young unattended for up to eight hours at a time, an anti-predator mechanism that minimizes scent left around the newborn animals. “The same holds true for rabbits, ground-dwelling birds and other wildlife,” she said. “Even avian parents will continue to care for hatchlings that have fallen from a nest.”

The DNR advises that:
  • Many baby animals will die if removed from their natural environment, and some have diseases or parasites that can be passed on to humans or pets. 
  • Some “rescued” animals that do survive become habituated to people and are unable to revert back to life in the wild. It is illegal to possess a wild deer in Michigan, and every day a deer spends with humans makes it that much less likely to be able to survive in the wild.
  • Eventually, habituated animals pose additional problems as they mature and develop adult animal behaviors. Habituated deer, especially bucks, can become aggressive as they mature, and raccoons are well-known for this, too.
“If you know of a deer or other animal that has been orphaned, early in the year – for example, if a doe is dead nearby – please call your local DNR office, they can refer you to a licensed rehabilitator,” said MacKinnon. “Licensed rehabilitators are trained to handle wild animals and know how to release them so that they can survive in the wild.”

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

Southwestern Michigan’s River Country overflows with summer fun

Grab the 2011 River Country Tourism Guide for the Year’s Events and Festivals

There’s so much to look forward to this summer, especially in Southwestern Michigan. Many of River Country’s back-to-back events can last one day or one week but it only takes one tank of gas to enjoy this adventure so go ahead, stay the night. Visit www.RiverCountry.com or pick up a copy of the 2011 River Country Tourism Guide at any Michigan Welcome Center, on the I-80/90 toll road or call us at 248-459-0125 to view the six-page calendar of events and festivals.

Everyone can stay busy this summer vacation by filling it with family friendly fun. These events are enough fun to keep any age involved, from The County Fair, street parades, concerts, carnivals, golf tourneys and more. Events are also listed on the River Country calendar www.my.calendars.net/rivcountcalendar.

May 1 The 48th Annual Car Show, the Mendon Dust-Off in downtown Mendon, MI. 8 a.m.-3p.m. 269-649-1335.

May 6 Mother’s Day Race Presented by Powell the Florist. Regular Racing Program. Check website for full racing schedule and rates. M40 Speedway, Jones 269-244-8580 www.m40speedway.net

May 7 Three Rivers Farmer’s Market and Petting Zoo The Zoo Opens at 9:00 am in Scidmore Park, Three Rivers 269-273-1845

May 7, 14, 21, 28 Sturgis Farmer’s Market Downtown Sturgis 269-651-1907

May 7 10th Annual Spring Big Cup Tournament Call Pine View Golf Club for more information 269-279-5131 www.pineviewgolf.com

May 8 Antique & Collectibles Market Admission is only $4.00 per person - parking is FREE! Hours: Sunday 8:00 am-3: 30 pm Rain or Shine *100’s of treasures* food vendors. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 8:00a-3: 30p 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

May 13-15 All American Bulldog Show Call for more information. St Joseph
County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

May 13, Art/Music/Maypole/Ice Cream Sundae Bar Family fun at Shelby Park, Constantine 269-435-2085

May 13 Ladies Night Each lady will receive a free M40 T-Shirt presented by Advance Properties. Regular Racing Program. Check website for full racing schedule and rates. M40 Speedway, Jones 269-244-8580 www.m40speedway.net

May 14 Abbott’s Annual Flea Market/Auction Free to attend. Beginning at 9:00 am the flea market is open and every hour, will be 15-minute auctions up until 3:00 pm and then the rest of the auction will take place. Abbott’s Magic Company, Colon 269-432-3235 www.abbottmagic.com

May 17 Fish Fry Proceeds to go to the Constantine Fire Department. Call 269-435-5325 for details. Constantine.

May 22 Classic Motorcycle Swap Meet Antique motorcycles on display. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

May 22 Australian Dog Show Call for more information. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

May 29 Gospel Concert “The Heralders” Southern Gospel Quartet. Clubhouse 6:00 pm. Freewill offering. Finger food afterwards. Kline’s Resort, Three Rivers 269-649-2514 www.klinesresort.com

May 29 “18 with The Zuu” (Zuu Radio) Golf, cart, steak dinner, beverage, prizes, plus… we've got lots of stuff to give away! $140 for team of 4. Call for reservations. Pine View Golf Club, Three Rivers 269-279-5131

May 30 Pancake Breakfast Kline’s Resort, Three Rivers 8:00a-10:00a 269-649-2514 www.klinesresort.com

May 30 Memorial Parade begins at 10:00 am on the 131 Bridge. Contact Constantine American Legion at 269-435-4075 for more information. Constantine

May 30 Annual Chicken/Rib Dinner Held from 11:00 am until sold out. Free museum tours available. Gov. John S Barry Society, Constantine 269-435-7360

June 3, 4, 5 Great Lakes Buckskin Horse Show Call for more information. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

June 3 Kids Night (Race) Kids Night Regular Racing Program. Check website for full racing schedule and rates. M40 Speedway, Jones 269-244-8580 www.m40speedway.net

June 4 Double-time Triathlon USAT sanctioned sprint triathlon sponsored by Friends of Portage Lake. Start time 8:00 am. Registration and info at www.doubletimetri.com Kline’s Resort, Three Rivers 269-978-2437 www.klinesresort.com

June 4 Magic Show Enjoy a magic show for everyone at 1:00 pm. Abbott’s Magic Company, Colon 269-432-3235 www.abbottmagic.com

June 4 Junkyard Wars (Race) Check website for full racing schedule and rates. M40 Speedway, Jones 269-244-8580 www.m40speedway.net

June 4 Bubs 73 Golf Outing For more information call Pine View Golf Club
269-279-5131 www.pineviewgolf.com

June 6 Circus Evening shows are planned. Call for more information. St Joseph
County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com
 
June 8 National Dairy Festival 3:00p-7:00p Location Constantine 269-435-2085

June 8, 15, 22 Constantine Farmer’s Market Local produce available from 3:00 pm-7:00 pm in Shelby Park. Constantine 269-435-2085

June 10-11 Sturgis Area Relay for Life (American Cancer Society) Sturgis High School. www.relayforlife.org/sturgismi

June 10 Special Olympics Golf Outing Support the Special Olympics. Call for details and registration. Pine View Golf Club, Three Rivers 269-279-5131 www.pineviewgolf.com

June 11-12 Free Fishing Weekend No License Required

June 11 Clubhouse Grand Opening Party Come celebrate our new facility with free food, music, open house and ice cream social. Kline’s Resort, Three Rivers 12:00p-4:00p 269-649-2514 www.klinesresort.com

June 11, 18, 25 Magic Show Enjoy a magic show for everyone at 1:00 pm. Abbott’s Magic Company, Colon 269-432-3235 www.abbottmagic.com

June 12 Antique & Collectibles Market Admission is only $4.00 per person – parking is FREE! Hours: Sunday Rain or Shine *100’s of treasures* food vendors. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 8:00a-3:30p 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

June 16-18 55th Annual Three Rivers Water Festival Arts and crafts, car show,
ox roast, live entertainment, fireworks, parade, pancake breakfast, food vendors and KidsZone. Three Rivers 269-278-8193 www.trchamber.com

June 16-19 Michigan Hackney Pony Show Call for more information. St Joseph
County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

June 17-19 Great Lakes Championship Boat Races Michigan Hydroplane Racing Association (MHRA), premier Stock Outboard Racing club in the U.S.
Constantine 269-435-4075

June 17 2011 Hydroplane Racing Association (MHRA) The premier Stock Outboard Racing club in the U.S, sanctioned under the American Power Boat Association (APBA). American Legion, call for more details 269-435-4075

June 18 Antique Tractor Pulls & Farm Truck Pulls Free admission to the general public. 8:00 am antique tractor pulls; 2:00 pm farm truck pulls. Food trailer available. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

June 18 The 1st Annual Great Lakes Parafest Buy tickets online in advance at theniparanormalsociety@gmail.com for $20 in advance or $25 at the door. 500 W. Chicago Rd Sturgis 269-464-2010 9:00a-8:30p www.thenorthernindianaparanormalsociety.com

June 19 Father’s Day/Kids Fun Day (Race) Presented by Stock Car Extreme. Regular Racing Program. Check website for full racing schedule and rates. M40 Speedway, Jones 269-244-8580 www.m40speedway.net

June 20 Centreville Bulldog Open Fundraiser Proceeds for Centreville Schools. Pine View Golf Club, 268-279-5131 www.pineviewgolf.com

June 20 Bad Back Golf Outing Call Pine View Golf Club for more information 269-279-5131 www.pineviewgolf.com

June 18 Antique Tractor Pulls & Farm Truck Pulls 8:00 am antique tractor pulls; 2:00 pm farm truck pulls. Free admission to the general public. Food trailer available. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

June 23 Michigan Amputee Golf Association Scramble Great food, fun, and golf. $50 per person/ $40 for amputee. Call for reservations. Pine View Golf Club, Three Rivers 269-279-5131 www.pineviewgolf.com

June 24 Three Rivers Area Relay for Life (American Cancer Society) Three Rivers High School. www.relayforlife.org/threeriversmi

June 24-25 Covered Bridge Days Enjoy craft shows, live music, car shows and
more. Centreville 269-467-7468

June 24-26 Disney’s “Alice in Wonderland” (Apple Crate Kids) visit once again the White Rabbit, Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat and the Queen of Hearts. Three Rivers Community Players, Three Rivers 269-273-1121 www.trcommunityplayers.org

June 25-26 Draft Horse Show Call for more information. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

June 25-July 1 Sturgis Dam Days Call Chamber for details. Sturgis 269-651-5758 www.sturgischamber.com

July 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Three Rivers Farmer’s Market and Petting Zoo In Scidmore Park, Three Rivers 9a.m. 269-273-1845

July 2 Magic Show Enjoy a magic show for everyone at 1:00 pm. Abbott’s Magic Company, Colon 269-432-3235 www.abbottmagic.com

July 4 Pancake Breakfast Location at Clubhouse. Kline’s Resort, 8:00a-10:00a Three Rivers 269-649-2514 www.klinesresort.com

July 4 Boat Parade Sponsored by Friends of Portage Lake. 12:00 pm. Kline’s Resort, Three Rivers 269-649-2514 www.klinesresort.com

July 4 Fourth of July Celebration Parade Fireworks, kids games. The 4th of July is always celebrated on July 4th in Constantine. 269-435-2085

July 6, 13, 20, 27 Constantine Farmer’s Market Local produce available from 3:00 pm-7:00 pm in Shelby Park. Constantine 269-435-2085

July 8-9 Antique Boat Show Constantine American Legion 269-435-4075

July 8-9 White Pigeon Days Craft Fair Entertainment and a parade. Dancing and fireworks. White Pigeon 269-483-7727

July 8-10 Great Lakes Buckskin Horse Show Call for more information. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

July 9-10 Independence Day 125 and Fireworks CRA Cuperseries, LS Mini Cups. Check website for full racing schedule and rates. M40 Speedway, Jones 269-244-8580 www.m40speedway.net

July 9 Community Yard Sale Come early! We close at noon. Kline’s Resort, Three Rivers 8:00p 12:00p 269-649-2514 www.klinesresort.com

July 10 Antique & Collectibles Market Admission is only $4.00 per person – parking is FREE! Hours: Sunday Rain or Shine *100’s of treasures* food vendors. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 8:00a-3:30p 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

July Gospel Concert “The Chosen Ones” 6:00 pm at Clubhouse. Bring a lawn chairs or blanket. Refreshments after. A freewill offering will be taken. Kline’s Resort, Three Rivers 269-649-2514 www.klinesresort.com

July 13 2nd Annual Car Show Located Downtown Constantine 269-435-2085

July 15 Autograph Night Regular Racing Program. Check website for full racing schedule and rates. M40 Speedway, Jones 269-244-8580 www.m40speedway.net

July 17-21 MiLow’s Mid-West Rally “River Country” Come for fun, games, dancing, side trips including Canoeing, Amish Country Tour, Air Zoo of Kalamazoo (an extra fee $ May be incurred for the side trips) Rally fee $65 by June 30 ($75 thereafter) (includes 3 hot breakfasts, 1 continental breakfast, 3 dinners) Camping fee $17 per night (electric, water and dump station) Sunday night dinner: Hobo Stew, please bring a can of soup (no cream or seafood) and “join” us for dinner. St. Joseph County Fair Grounds, Centreville, MI 49032 Please contact Sylvia for pre-registration information and form at:517-487-5032 or sly-1@att.net

July 22-24 U.S. Title Boat Races Constantine American Legion 269-435-4075
July 23 Faith Fest Call for more information. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

July 29-31 Burr Oaks 3rd Annual Heritage Celebration Games, parade, vendors, fireworks and food! 269-489-5258

July 30 State Line Swine & Goat Show Call for more information. St Joseph County Fairgrounds, Centreville 269-467-8935 www.centrevillefair.com

July 30 Constantine Community Children’s Carnival Games, cake walk, clown food and more. $0.50 per activity or meal. No child goes away empty-handed! Messiah Lutheran Church, Constantine 269-435-9785

To learn more about the events in St. Joseph County this summer or sooner pick up your copy of the 2011 River Country Tourism Guide at your nearest Michigan Welcome Center or on the I-80/90 toll road or most AAA of Michigan offices. You can also visit us online at www.RiverCountry.com, Twitter.com/RiverCountryMI or read our blog at RiverCountrySouthwestMichigan.blogspot.com or call us, 248-459-0125.

The River Country Tourism Council promotes travel to the greater Michigan St. Joseph County area, which is located halfway between Detroit and Chicago in Southwest Michigan and nestled between I-94 to the north and I-80/90 to the south.

Michigan DNR 'Becoming an Outdoors-Woman' program set for June 3-5 in the Upper Peninsula

Women seeking to improve their outdoor skills can now register for the 14th annual Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) summer program, held Friday, June 3, through Sunday, June 5, in Big Bay, a picturesque community overlooking Lake Superior 30 miles north of Marquette.

Sponsored by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, this BOW program offers instruction in more than two dozen kinds of outdoor activities, including kayaking, canoeing, fishing, mountain biking, fly-tying, archery, geocaching, boating and birding.

Volunteer BOW instructors provide basic and advanced instruction that is uniquely tailored to each participant's individual ability, helping the participants learn the basics in a short amount of time.

The $175 registration fee includes all food and lodging, as well as most equipment and supplies (except as noted in the registration materials). Participants will be housed in a dorm-style facility at the universally-accessible Big Bay Health Camp, with numerous amenities, including a pool, sauna, tennis courts, hiking and biking trails and easy access to Lake Superior. The BOW summer program also includes special evening programs, such as birding hikes, group bonfires and more.

Becoming an Outdoors-Woman workshops are for women, 18 and older, who wish to learn outdoor skills in a relaxed, noncompetitive atmosphere. Early registration is recommended as the workshops tend to fill quickly. A limited number of BOW Scholarships are available to help low-income participants with the cost of registration. Class information and registration materials are available online at www.michigan.gov/bow. For more information, contact Sharon Pitz at the DNR office in Marquette at 906-228-6561 or e-mail pitzs@michigan.gov.

For more information about the various Becoming an Outdoors-Woman programs offered in Michigan, go online to www.michigan.gov/bow.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

Illinois Youth Conservation Congress Rescheduled


SPRINGFIELD, IL – The second annual Youth Conservation Congress scheduled for May 15, 2011 at the Brookfield Zoo has been postponed. An exact date has not been set but the event will be rescheduled for the fall.

At the second annual Youth Conservation Congress, participants can take part in panel discussions, learn about various intern opportunities, update the group on their organization’s conservation activities and network with other environmental stewards. Students will also have the opportunity to serve on the first Statewide Youth Conservation Congress Committee, which is designed to provide a voice on conservation matters from the youth perspective.

Day 16 of the Bacon-atarian Challenge: Pinach and Bacon Quiche

Day 16
Recap: My wife's friends are doing a 21-day vegan challenge. She decided to counter that with a 21-Day Bacon Everyday Challenge. The catch is that we can't have bacon the same way twice.

Day 1: Crumbled bacon on our hamburgers. Wifey had hers with bleu cheese, mine was American. Plus lettuce, tomatoes, ketchup and mustard.

Day 2: Bacon-wrapped tenderloin! Cooked in the oven and then thrown on the grill for a couple of minutes. A perfect medium rare. So tender, so delicious. Much better than bean sprouts or whatever plants my wife's friends ate.

Day 3: Pizza with pineapple and bacon. Baseball season has started and tonight we had two practices - same thing on Tuesdays - so it was a quickie dinner.

Day 4: Chocolate covered bacon. Yes, I know, it sounds disgusting. Well, it sounded disgusting to me anyways. Wifey has been wanting to try this for years, and the Bacon-atarian Challenge was her perfect opportunity, and a party we were at last night was the perfect time for it. Melted semi-sweet chocolate chips completely covering cooked thick-cut bacon strips. The verdict? People either loved it or hated it. Definitely worth trying once, I would say.

Day 5: Patty Cakes. These are leftover mashed potatoes mixed with an egg, bacon, cheese, onion powder, salt and pepper. Kind of like a fried twice-baked potato pancake. Not too bad.

Day 6: Tossed Salad with Bacon. No explanation needed.

Day 7: Breakfast for Dinner. Simple bacon strips matched with pancakes and hash brown patties. Simple, yet effective.

Day 8: Bacon-Potato Soup, with melted cheddar cheese, parsley and celery. Not the type of thing you'd expect with warm weather, but three of us are under the weather.

Day 9: Deviled Eggs made with bacon, a little sugar, mayo and balsamic vinegar.

Day 10: Southern Smokehouse Burger from Chili's Grill & Bar Restaurant. With maple bacon, smoked cheddar, mayo, crispy onion strings and ancho-chile BBQ sauce.

Day 11: Chocolate-chocolate chip-bacon cookies. They are really good.

Day 12: Peppered Bacon and Tomato Linguine. Extremely tasty.

Day 13: BLTs, an All-American Classic.

Day 14: Chicken-and-Bacon Wraps. Kinda whipped this one up. Heated up some frozen popcorn chicken, cut it into small slices, then threw it on a flour tortilla. Added some lettuce, swiss cheese, mayo with olive oil mixed in and tomato slices. Oh, and a generous helping of bacon bits. Very, very tasty.

Day 15: Mac-n-Cheese with crumbled bacon. I hate Mac-n-Cheese. Bacon made it reasonably okay.

Day 16: Spinach and Bacon Quiche. Not normally, a quiche kind of guy, but this was surprisingly good.

Day 17: ?

Bay Pointe Inn Records 51% First Quarter growth for 2011 one year after opening the Fireside Banquet & Conference Center

Bay Pointe Inn “One of Michigan’s Top Resorts” has announced record first quarter growth for 2011 only one year after opening the Fireside Banquet & Conference Center.

The 80-seat Banquet & Conference Center marked the Resort’s second expansion since 2008.

In the first year, the Resort has hosted over 150 events in the Fireside Room with local, national and international guests. The addition of the Lakefront Event Pavilion in 2008 has resulted in a 400% increase in wedding demand.

“The Fireside Banquet & Conference Center has exceeded our expectations accommodating increased year-round demand from corporate and social groups. The ideal balance between location, technology, service and design has been well received by our guests. Bay Pointe Inn has achieved our objective of being West Michigan’s Premier Corporate and Social Event Venue,” Michael Powers, Owner, said. “The opening of the nearby Gun Lake Casino has complemented our growth by offering high energy entertainment to our guests.”

The increased business has produced the need for an additional ten year round jobs and 25 additional seasonal positions while boosting the local economy. The Fireside Banquet & Conference Center features seating for up to 80, the latest in meeting technology, 12’ Grand Fireplace, lakefront patio and designer inspired d├ęcor. Bay Pointe Inn is a full service resort conveniently located midway between Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo.

For more information about Bay Pointe Inn & Terrace Grille Restaurant please call 1-888-GUN-LAKE or visit their website www.baypointeinn.com

Michigan DNR seeking volunteer harbor hosts for Straits State Harbor in Mackinaw City

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is seeking volunteer harbor hosts for Straits State Harbor during the summer of 2011. The Volunteer Host Program allows individuals to stay in a state harbor at no charge in return for providing visitor assistance at the harbor.

Straits State Harbor is an award-winning harbor, featuring eight wind turbines that produce energy for the harbor. The facility also makes use of natural light, recycled materials and other eco-friendly features. The harbor is one of the newest, and most energy efficient harbors on the Great Lakes. Straits State Harbor is located at 409 S. Huron Ave. in downtown Mackinaw City, a premier tourist destination that offers a variety of activities, including museums, shopping, restaurants, golf, historic parks, the Mackinac Bridge and Mackinac Island.

The harbor has 136 slips for transient boaters, and offers electricity, gas, diesel and pump out service. Other amenities include a comfort station with showers and laundry, boat launch, fishing pier, grills, picnic shelters, refuse and recycling containers, and a dog run.

Harbor hosts at Straits State Harbor would assist harbor visitors by directing them to their boat slips, helping them tie off their boats, answering questions about the harbor and local tourism, organizing harbor activities and performing light maintenance and other services, depending on the host's talents and interests.

Harbor hosts can be individuals or teams. Hosts must be at least 18 years old, provide services for five days, 30 hours per week, including weekends and holidays, serve a minimum of four consecutive weeks and furnish their own vessel, equipment and personal items. Retired couples, teachers, college students and families are some of the people who have enjoyed volunteering as hosts in other state locations.

Hosts must attend a two-day training session at the end of April at the Ralph A. MacMullan Conference Center in Roscommon. Harbor hosts are chosen by park managers who may require an interview or request additional information. Selection is based on the individual's familiarity with the harbor, their boating experience, special skills, availability, knowledge of the area, and the needs of the harbor.

Persons interested in volunteering as a harbor host at Straits State Harbor should send an application as soon as possible to the Cheboygan Field Office, Attn: Harbor Host Program, 120 A Street, Cheboygan, MI 49721. For more information about the harbor or the harbor host program, contact the Cheboygan Field Office at 231-627-9011 (TTY/TDD711 Michigan Relay Center for the hearing impaired).

This is the first year for the Harbor Host program, an expansion of the already successful Campground Host program. Persons interested in becoming a campground or harbor host at a state park or harbor, should apply directly to the state park/harbor of their choice. For more information about other DNR volunteer opportunities, or to download an application, visit www.michigan.gov/dnrvolunteers, or contact Pam Ames at 517-467-7401.

Michigan's Pere Marquette Rail-Trail partially closed for surfacing project

From the Friends of the
Pere Marquette Rail-Trail
http://www.lmb.org/pmrt/
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced today that a portion of the Pere Marquette State Rail-Trail will be temporarily closed for the months of June and July. This closure is due to asphalt surfacing and drainage improvements. The closed portion of the trail will be from Evart to east of Partridge Avenue in Clare County, approximately 11 miles in length.

The paving material used is a special mix that has proven to withstand the wear associated with snowmobile use. The surfacing project is expected to be completed by the end of July. After completion, this project will provide a continuous 36-mile paved trail from Reed City all the way to Farwell. The Michigan Department of Transportation is funding this project by a grant from the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

For more information about Michigan’s Rail-Trails, go to www.michigan.gov/dnrtrails.

Day 15 of the Bacon-atarian Challenge: Mac-n-Cheese with Crumbled Bacon

Day 15
Recap: My wife's friends are doing a 21-day vegan challenge. She decided to counter that with a 21-Day Bacon Everyday Challenge. The catch is that we can't have bacon the same way twice.

Day 1: Crumbled bacon on our hamburgers. Wifey had hers with bleu cheese, mine was American. Plus lettuce, tomatoes, ketchup and mustard.

Day 2: Bacon-wrapped tenderloin! Cooked in the oven and then thrown on the grill for a couple of minutes. A perfect medium rare. So tender, so delicious. Much better than bean sprouts or whatever plants my wife's friends ate.

Day 3: Pizza with pineapple and bacon. Baseball season has started and tonight we had two practices - same thing on Tuesdays - so it was a quickie dinner.

Day 4: Chocolate covered bacon. Yes, I know, it sounds disgusting. Well, it sounded disgusting to me anyways. Wifey has been wanting to try this for years, and the Bacon-atarian Challenge was her perfect opportunity, and a party we were at last night was the perfect time for it. Melted semi-sweet chocolate chips completely covering cooked thick-cut bacon strips. The verdict? People either loved it or hated it. Definitely worth trying once, I would say.

Day 5: Patty Cakes. These are leftover mashed potatoes mixed with an egg, bacon, cheese, onion powder, salt and pepper. Kind of like a fried twice-baked potato pancake. Not too bad.

Day 6: Tossed Salad with Bacon. No explanation needed.

Day 7: Breakfast for Dinner. Simple bacon strips matched with pancakes and hash brown patties. Simple, yet effective.

Day 8: Bacon-Potato Soup, with melted cheddar cheese, parsley and celery. Not the type of thing you'd expect with warm weather, but three of us are under the weather.

Day 9: Deviled Eggs made with bacon, a little sugar, mayo and balsamic vinegar.

Day 10: Southern Smokehouse Burger from Chili's Grill & Bar Restaurant. With maple bacon, smoked cheddar, mayo, crispy onion strings and ancho-chile BBQ sauce.

Day 11: Chocolate-chocolate chip-bacon cookies. They are really good.

Day 12: Peppered Bacon and Tomato Linguine. Extremely tasty.

Day 13: BLTs, an All-American Classic.

Day 14: Chicken-and-Bacon Wraps. Kinda whipped this one up. Heated up some frozen popcorn chicken, cut it into small slices, then threw it on a flour tortilla. Added some lettuce, swiss cheese, mayo with olive oil mixed in and tomato slices. Oh, and a generous helping of bacon bits. Very, very tasty.

Day 15: Mac-n-Cheese with crumbled bacon. I hate Mac-n-Cheese. Bacon made it reasonably okay.

Day 16: ?

Day 14 of the Bacon-atarian Challenge: Chicken-and-Bacon Wraps

Day 14
Recap: My wife's friends are doing a 21-day vegan challenge. She decided to counter that with a 21-Day Bacon Everyday Challenge. The catch is that we can't have bacon the same way twice.

Day 1: Crumbled bacon on our hamburgers. Wifey had hers with bleu cheese, mine was American. Plus lettuce, tomatoes, ketchup and mustard.

Day 2: Bacon-wrapped tenderloin! Cooked in the oven and then thrown on the grill for a couple of minutes. A perfect medium rare. So tender, so delicious. Much better than bean sprouts or whatever plants my wife's friends ate.

Day 3: Pizza with pineapple and bacon. Baseball season has started and tonight we had two practices - same thing on Tuesdays - so it was a quickie dinner.

Day 4: Chocolate covered bacon. Yes, I know, it sounds disgusting. Well, it sounded disgusting to me anyways. Wifey has been wanting to try this for years, and the Bacon-atarian Challenge was her perfect opportunity, and a party we were at last night was the perfect time for it. Melted semi-sweet chocolate chips completely covering cooked thick-cut bacon strips. The verdict? People either loved it or hated it. Definitely worth trying once, I would say.

Day 5: Patty Cakes. These are leftover mashed potatoes mixed with an egg, bacon, cheese, onion powder, salt and pepper. Kind of like a fried twice-baked potato pancake. Not too bad.

Day 6: Tossed Salad with Bacon. No explanation needed.

Day 7: Breakfast for Dinner. Simple bacon strips matched with pancakes and hash brown patties. Simple, yet effective.

Day 8: Bacon-Potato Soup, with melted cheddar cheese, parsley and celery. Not the type of thing you'd expect with warm weather, but three of us are under the weather.

Day 9: Deviled Eggs made with bacon, a little sugar, mayo and balsamic vinegar.

Day 10: Southern Smokehouse Burger from Chili's Grill & Bar Restaurant. With maple bacon, smoked cheddar, mayo, crispy onion strings and ancho-chile BBQ sauce.

Day 11: Chocolate-chocolate chip-bacon cookies. They are really good.

Day 12: Peppered Bacon and Tomato Linguine. Extremely tasty.

Day 13: BLTs, an All-American Classic.

Day 14: Chicken-and-Bacon Wraps. Kinda whipped this one up. Heated up some frozen popcorn chicken, cut it into small slices, then threw it on a flour tortilla. Added some lettuce, swiss cheese, mayo with olive oil mixed in and tomato slices. Oh, and a generous helping of bacon bits. Very, very tasty.

Day 15: ?

Easter ‘Egg-stravaganzas’ set at Michigan State Parks April 23

The Easter Bunny is busy hiding eggs in several Michigan state parks and recreation areas, and the Department of Natural Resources welcomes youngsters and families to bring their baskets and join in the hunt.

All Easter events are being held on Saturday, April 23, at varying times, at the following state parks or recreation areas:

Bay City State Recreation Area Easter Egg Hunt (Bay County) 
The Bay City State Recreation Area will host an Easter Egg Hunt beginning at 11 a.m. at the day use area. Participants will be divided into various age groups, with special prizes awarded to children finding winning eggs. The Easter Bunny will also make a special appearance. Bay City State Recreation Area is located at 3582 State Park Dr., north of Bay City, five miles east of Exit 168 off I-75. For details, contact the park at 989-684-3020.

Egg Hunt on “Old Baldy” - Bald Mountain Recreation Area (Oakland County) 
The Easter Bunny is hiding thousands of eggs at Bald Mountain Recreation Area. From 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., children up to age 12 are welcome to join in the search for Easter eggs at the Cherry Ridge picnic area. Some eggs are filled with candy or special prizes. Everyone will win something. Bald Mountain Recreation Area is located at 1330 East Greenshield Rd., 1.5 miles east of M-24 in Lake Orion. For details, contact the park at 248-693-6767.

Lakeport State Park Easter Festival (St. Clair County) 
Join the Easter Bunny, the Easter Chicken and Scooby-Doo for an Easter Festival beginning at 11 a.m. at the park pavilion. Children, from toddlers to teens, will be divided into separate age groups to gather eggs and search for the golden eggs that contain special prizes. Families should bring a bag to carry prizes home, and remember to bring a camera. Lakeport State Park is located at 7605 Lakeshore Rd., approximately 15 miles north of I-94 off M-25, near Lakeport. For details, contact the park at 810-327-6224.

Easter Egg Scramble at Maybury State Park (Wayne County) 
Get the family together for the annual Easter Egg Scramble at Maybury State Park. Activities for children of all ages begin at 10 a.m., followed by the scramble for Easter eggs spread over a grassy area. The Easter Bunny will also be available for pictures. Maybury State Park is located at 20145 Beck Rd., west of Northville. Park entrance is off Eight Mile Road, five miles west of I-275, four miles north of M-14, or four miles south of I-96. For details, contact the park at 248-349-8390.

Young State Park Easter Egg Hunt (Charlevoix County) 
Young State Park will sponsor an Easter Egg Hunt starting at 11 a.m. at Mirror Pond. Participation is limited to children ages 10 and under. Families can enjoy a bonfire, hot cocoa and cookies, and a visit with the Easter Bunny after the Easter egg hunt. Young State Park is located at 02280 Boyne City Rd., off M-75, north of Boyne City. For details, contact the park at 231-582-7523.

All events are free; however, a Recreation Passport is required for vehicles entering a state park or recreation area.

The Recreation Passport has replaced motor vehicle permits for entry into Michigan state parks, recreation areas and state-administered boating access fee sites. This new way to fund Michigan's outdoor recreation opportunities also helps to preserve state forest campgrounds, trails, and historic and cultural sites in state parks, and provides park development grants to local communities. Michigan residents can purchase the Recreation Passport ($10 for motor vehicles; $5 for motorcycles) by checking "Yes" on their license plate renewal forms, or at any state park or recreation area. To learn more about the Recreation Passport, visit www.michigan.gov/recreationpassport, or call 517-241-7275.

Toledo Museum of Art May 2011 Program Highlights


Continuing Exhibitions 
The Baroque World of Fernando Botero 
Through June 12, 2011, Galleries 28 A–C 
Known for the larger-than-life scale of his work and his use of vibrant colors, Colombian painter, sculptor and draftsman Fernando Botero (b. 1932) has a style instantly recognized as his alone. Art Service International organized this traveling exhibition of 100 of Botero’s paintings, sculptures and drawings. Admission is free for TMA members and children under 6 years of age; admission for nonmembers is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors age 65 and over, and $5 for students ages 6 to 22. Reduced rates are available for student and other groups. A companion catalog is available for purchase in the Museum Store.

Frank Stella: Irregular Polygons 
Through July 24, 2011, Canaday Gallery 
An American master of minimalism, Frank Stella (b. 1936) is a consistent innovator at the forefront of abstract art. The exhibition presents one of each of the artist’s 11 monumental compositions for the Irregular Polygons series (1965-66), along with preparatory drawings and the 1974 print series Eccentric Polygons based on the Irregular Polygons. Stella is the first artist in history to deliberately create a set of paintings shaped as irregular polygons. This exhibition marks the first time the series has been shown in one room. This exhibition, organized and originally shown at Dartmouth College’s Hood Museum of Art, is made possible by members of the Toledo Museum of Art and support from KeyBank and the sustainable grant program of the Ohio Arts Council. A companion book is available for purchase in the Museum Store. Admission is free.

The Egypt Experience: Secrets of the Tomb 
Through May 31, 2012, Lower Level Egyptian Gallery, Main Museum 
More than 150 objects spanning 3,000 years of history are on display, including objects from the Museum’s antiquities collection and from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Field Museum, Indiana University Art Museum and the Oriental Museum Institute of the University of Chicago. Admission is free for TMA members and children under 6 years of age; admission for nonmembers is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors over 65, and $5 for students ages 6 to 22. The exhibition is made possible by the generosity of TMA members and with support in part from Taylor Cadillac, Buckeye CableSystem and the sustainable grant program of the Ohio Arts Council.

The Dramatic Image: Baroque Prints of the 17th Century 
Through July 31, 2011, Works on Paper Galleries 
Prints from the Baroque period (1600–1750) convey strong emotions through subjects filled with dynamic movement and dramatic architecture. The impressive works in this exhibition are conceived in a wide range of styles and techniques by leading European artists of the period. Admission is free.

What’s Wrong with Me? Art and Disease 
Through Aug.7, 2011, Hitchcock Gallery 
As part of an art history class, University of Toledo students selected 31 works to design an exhibition that explores the relationships between art, disease and human civilization. Most of the works are prints from the TMA collection. Admission is free.

On View in the Community Galleries
Insider Art: A TMA Staff Exhibition 
Through May 8, 2011, Community Gallery 
What kind of creative people work in an art museum? Toledo Museum of Art staff, inspired by a world-class collection every day, show their eclectic talents in producing their own works of art. Admission is free.

It’s in the Bag 
Through May 15, 2011, Community Gallery 
Students from the Toledo Museum of Art High School Art Council were each given a plastic sealable bag and asked to fill it with art. The students could choose any medium or method of producing art that can be contained in a quart-sized bag. See how diverse “bag art” can be when dozens of artists are given the same challenge and achieve widely varied results. Admission is free.

All Things Asian
May 27–July 3, 2011, Community Gallery 
Asian artists from the University of Michigan, University of Toledo and Bowling Green State University come together for an exhibition of works of art in a variety of media and styles. A number of Asian nations are represented. A public reception for the artists takes place from 6:30–8:30 p.m. May 27. Admission is free to both the exhibition and reception.

Special Events & Presentations
FREE Presentation: Fernando Botero and the Art of Radical Stylization 
May 6: 7:30 p.m., Little Theater 
Fernando Botero’s international appeal rests largely with his immediately recognized style. He has applied his “inflated” stylization to subjects ranging from art historical precedents to scenes of political turmoil in contemporary life. Don Bacigalupi, executive director of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas and former director of the Toledo Museum of Art, explores the ways in which Botero’s stylizations borrow from and resonate with other artists’ uniquely exaggerated styles, from old masters to cutting-edge contemporary artists.

Kentucky Derby Race Simulcast Live in Peristyle 
May 7: 4–8 p.m., Peristyle and Museum Grounds 
The public is invited to come to the Toledo Museum of Art for an afternoon of Kentucky Derby fun. This year’s race will be simulcast live onto a screen that fills the majestic Peristyle stage. Other events taking place throughout the Peristyle, outdoor terraces and Welles Sculpture Garden include a Derby hat contest, raffles, a 50/50 drawing and live music by area bands. Local restaurants as well as TMA Chef Erika Rapp will offer a tempting variety of traditional Derby foods. A cash bar will feature beer, wine and mint juleps. Hosted by the Museum’s Cultivation Committee, the Kentucky Derby Party is a community outreach and fundraising event to support school tours of The Egypt Experience exhibition. Tickets ($25 members/$35 nonmembers) can be purchased online at toledomuseum.org/events/derbyparty or by calling 419-255-8000 ext. 7432. The live race simulcast is being provided by NBC24 WNWO Toledo.

FREE Presentation: Myths and Mummies 
May 13: 7:30 p.m., Peristyle 
The ancient Egyptians were masters at mummy making. The secrets of mummification were passed from generation to generation but never written down. Dr. Bob Brier, a senior research fellow at Long Island University, will discuss his research in the ancient Egyptian methods of mummification, and Patricia Remler will discuss why the Egyptians’ mythology and religion led them to preserve their bodies. Known as “Mr. Mummy,” Brier is one of the world's foremost experts on mummies. As part of his pioneering research in mummification practices, he has investigated some of the world’s most famous mummies, including King Tut, Vladimir Lenin and Ramses the Great. He was the first person to mummify a human cadaver using the exact techniques of the ancient Egyptians. Remler is an author, photographer and art historian. She has been a researcher for numerous documentaries on Egypt and mummies, and is the author of Egyptian Mythology A–Z. She teaches ancient Egyptian art and mythology at Long Island University.

FREE Masters Series Lecture: Museums and Memory

May 18: 6 p.m., Peristyle
Founded at the turn of the last century, the Toledo Museum of Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Detroit Institute of Arts are three of the most prestigious museums in the country today. All three, however, have dealt with the challenges of economic downturn and changing demographics. And, notably, now all three American museums are led by international directors. On International Museum Day, Irish-born Brian Kennedy, director of the Toledo Museum of Art, has invited the DIA’s Graham Beal, a native of Great Britain, and Cleveland’s David Franklin, originally from Canada, to join him on the Peristyle stage for a wide-ranging discussion about the state of these grand “temples of art.”



FREE Presentation: Daily Life in Ancient Egypt: A Fresh Look 
May 20: 7:30 p.m., Little Theater 
William H. Peck, author of the new book Egypt in Toledo, published by the Toledo Museum of Art, is a retired curator of ancient art at the Detroit Institute of Arts and an active archaeologist. He will discuss the artistic, literary and archaeological sources that provide clues into the daily life of ancient Egyptians. Peck has participated in excavations at the site of ancient Mendes in the Eastern Nile Delta and in the Precinct of the Goddess Mut at Karnak. He also is the author of a number of works on Egyptian art, including Drawings from Ancient Egypt and Splendors of Ancient Egypt. This Kurt Luckner Annual Lecture is co-sponsored with the Archaeological Institute of America-Toledo Society.

Mother’s Day Activities 
The Toledo Museum of Art is a popular destination on Mothers’ Day. The following activities take place this year on Mother’s Day:

FREE Family Center Activities: Monet Water Lilies! 
May 8: Noon–5:30 p.m. 
Find inspiration in Claude Monet’s painting of water lilies, and create your own version with foam paint. Activities are geared for children 10 and younger and their adult companions.

FREE Glassblowing Demonstrations 
May 8: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop

FREE Family Time Tour 
May 8: 2 p.m., meet in Family Center or Libbey Court

FREE Hands-on Activity: Make a Mummy with Your Mommy 
May 8: 2–4 p.m., Libbey Court 
Bring your Mom to the Museum on her special day. See mummies in The Egypt Experience exhibition (tickets required), then create a mini version complete with sarcophagus.

FREE Public Tour: A Mother’s Love 
May 8: 3 p.m., Libbey Court

Art Hours: Create a Glass Flower 
May 8: 4 and 5 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
Give glassworking a try at an Art Hour studio session. Buy tickets ($15 members/$25 nonmembers, no refunds) in person or by phone during Museum hours starting the Tuesday before the session. Adults and children ages 14 and above with an adult are welcome.

Glass Artists Lectures/Demonstrations  
FREE Lecture: Visiting Glass Artist Shane Fero 
May 13: 6 p.m. Lecture, Little Theater 
May 13: 7–10 p.m. Demonstration, Glass Pavilion® 
Shane Fero has been in glass flameworking for 40 years. His intricate work can be found in more than 20 museums worldwide. He has had dozens of solo exhibitions and more than 400 group exhibitions during his career.

FREE Featured Local Glass Artist Demonstration: Andrew Madvin 
May 27: 7–10 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop

FREE Performances 
FREE Dutch Organ Concert 
May 1: 2 p.m., Gallery 24 
Organist Joan Holder McConnell gives a concert commemorating the exhibition of Rembrandt Laughing on the last day it is on display at the Toledo Museum of Art. The small oil-on-copper portrait is on loan from a private collection, courtesy of Hazlitt Gooden & Fox, London.

Club Friday Music 
May 6: 6:30–9:30 p.m., Cloister 
Quick Trio (jazz/grooves). Cash bar available.

FREE Guitar and Flute Concert 
May 22: 3 p.m., Cloister 
Guitarist Bob Baratta and flutist Desra Dadney, who perform widely and teach in Findlay, perform works spanning several time periods and styles by such composers as Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, Gabriel Faure, Johann Sebastian Bach, Heiter Villa-Lobos and Claude Debussy.

Celebrate Asian Cultures 
May 27: 7–9:30 p.m., Museum Galleries 
Enjoy the rich cultures of Asia through performances, music and hands-on activities.

FREE Films
FREE Botero/Colombian Film Series: Love in the Time of Cholera 
May 27: 7:30 p.m., Little Theater 
How long would you wait for love? Based on the Nobel Prize-winning novel by Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Love in the Time of Cholera traces the vigil of Florentino Ariza, who waits for more than half a century to claim the hand of Fermina Daza, the woman he loves. English. 138 minutes. 2007.

Free Glassblowing Demonstrations 
May 1: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 3: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop
May 4: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 5: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 6: 2, 7, 8 and 9 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 7: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 8: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 10: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 11: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 12: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 13: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop (Also see listing for guest artist demonstration.) 
May 14: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 15: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 17: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 18: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 19: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 20: 2, 7, 8 and 9 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 21: 1 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 22: 1 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 24: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 25: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 26: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 27: 2 p.m. Glass Pavilion Hot Shop (Also see listing for guest artist demonstration) 
May 28: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 29: 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop 
May 31: 2 p.m., Glass Pavilion Hot Shop



Art Hours 
Learn to create objects in glass during a one-hour session at the Glass Pavilion®. Buy tickets ($15 TMA members/$25 nonmembers; no refunds) in person or by phone during Museum hours starting the Tuesday before each session. Adults and children 14 and older accompanied by an adult are welcome. Call 419-254-5771 ext. 7448.

Create a Glass Flower
May 1: 4 and 5 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 6: 6, 7 and 8 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 7: 4 and 5 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 8: 4 and 5 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 15: 4 and 5 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 20: 6, 7 and 8 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 27: 7 and 8 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 28: 4 and 5 p.m., Glass Pavilion 
May 29: 4 and 5 p.m., Glass Pavilion

Public Tours 
FREE Family Time Tours 
May 1, May 8, May 15, May 22 and May 29: 2 p.m., Meet in Family Center or Libbey Court

FREE Greatest Hits of the Collection 
May 1, May 22 and May 29: 3 p.m., Meet in Libbey Court

FREE Frank Stella: Irregular Polygons Exhibition 
May 6 and May 27: 6:30 and 7 p.m., Canaday Gallery 
May 15: 3 p.m., Canaday Gallery

FREE OurGlass Tour 
May 7: 2 and 3 p.m., Glass Pavilion

FREE Special Tour: Meet Me at TMA: Bon Appetit 
May 7: 1:30 p.m. 
At this month’s tour for those with mild memory loss and their companions, see artists’ visual feasts, then enjoy coffee, tea and cookies at the Museum. Reservations recommended but not required. Call the Alzheimer’s Association, Northwest Ohio Chapter at 419-537-1999.

FREE Public Tour: A Mothers Love 
May 8: 3 p.m., Meet in Libbey Court

FREE Inside Stories: The Art of Ancient Egypt 

May 13: 6:30 and 7 p.m., Meet in Libbey Court

FREE ArtSpeaks Series: Travel Log 
May 14: 2 and 3 p.m., Meet in Libbey Court

Guided Tours for Ticketholders: The Baroque World of Fernando Botero Exhibition 
May 20: 6:30 and 7 p.m., Libbey Court (Note: Exhibition tickets available for purchase at Visitors Desk in Herrick Lobby at the Museum or online at www.toledomuseum.org.)

FREE Public Tour: The Lost Painting: The Quest for a Caravaggio 
May 20: 7 p.m., Meet in Libbey Court

FREE ArtSpeaks Series: The Grand Tour 
May 21: 2 and 3 p.m., Meet in Libbey Court

FREE ArtSpeaks Series: Cities and Seasides 
May 28: 2 and 3 p.m., Meet in Libbey Court

FREE Family Center Activities 
For children 10 years of age and younger accompanied by an adult, art activities in the Family Center are made possible in part with support from The Andersons.

Mother’s Day Portraits 
In the style of artist Mary Cassatt, create a portrait to give to mom or another special person.
May 1: Noon–5:30 p.m., Family Center 
May 3and 5: 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Family Center

Monet Water Lilies 
Find inspiration in Claude Monet’s painting of water lilies and create your own version with foam paint.
May 8: Noon–5:30 p.m., Family Center 
May 10 and 12: 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Family Center

Matisse Mural 
Cut and create your own shapes inspired by the colorful mural, Apollo, by Henri Matisse.
May 17: Noon–5:30 p.m., Family Center 
May 19 and 21: 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Family Center

Printmaking 
Learn a variety of printmaking techniques that you can do at home.
May 22: Noon–5:30 p.m., Family Center 
May 24 and 26: 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Family Center

Chalk Pastels 
Catch the last days of the Fernando Botero exhibition (tickets required) and make your own Botero-inspired work.
May 29: Noon–5:30 p.m., Family Center 
May 31: 10 a.m.–3 p.m., Family Center

Note: Events are subject to change. Check the Museum’s online calendar at www.toledomuseum.org for the latest updates. For images, contact Teri Sharp, public relations manager, at 419-254-5082 or tsharp@toledomuseum.org, or Kelly Fritz Garrow, director of communications, at 419-255-8000, ext. 7408, or kgarrow@toledomuseum.org.


About the Toledo Museum of Art
The Toledo Museum of Art believes in the power of art to ignite the imagination, stimulate thought and provide enjoyment. Through our collection and programs, we strive to integrate art into the lives of people.

The Toledo Museum of Art is a nonprofit arts institution funded through individual donations, foundation grants, corporate sponsorships, and investments. The Ohio Arts Council helps fund programs at the Toledo Museum of Art through a sustainable grant program that encourages economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.

Admission to the Museum is free. The Museum is open Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, Noon to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays and major holidays. Friday evening hours are made possible by Fifth Third Bank.

The Museum is located at 2445 Monroe Street at Scottwood Avenue, just west of the downtown business district and one block off I-75 with exit designations posted. For general information, visitors can call 419-255-8000 or 800-644-6862, or visit www.toledomuseum.org.